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Colonoscopy

What is a colonoscopy and why is it necessary?
Colonoscopy is a minimally invasive endoscopic examination that allows your doctor to look at the interior lining of your large intestine (rectum and colon) through a thin, flexible viewing instrument called a colonoscope. It may provide a visual diagnosis (e.g. ulceration, polyps) and grants the opportunity for biopsy or removal of suspected lesions.

Colonoscopy is done to:
• Detect problems or diseases of the anus, rectum, or large intestine (colon). These tests are often done to investigate symptoms such as unexplained bleeding from the rectum, prolonged diarrhea or constipation, obvious or hidden (occult) blood or pus in the stool (feces), or lower abdominal pain.
• Evaluate the source of internal bleeding.
• Screen for colorectal cancer or polyps.
• Evaluate abnormal results from a barium enema test.
• Monitor the growth of polyps that cannot be completely removed.
• Screen for recurrence of colon or rectal cancer in people who have had surgical treatment for colon or rectal cancer.
• Remove polyps or take tissue samples (biopsy) when colon cancer or other bowel disease is suspected.
• Monitor treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.
• Evaluate an unexplained drop in hematocrit (one sign of anemia), usually along with an EGD (oesophagoastroduodenoscopy), in older patients and sometimes in younger patients as well.
• Remove foreign bodies.
• Evaluate the cause of chronic diarrhea.
• Some patients may need to have the colonoscopy repeated regularly to make sure new abnormalities have not developed.

Due to the high mortality associated with colon cancer and the high effectivity and low risks associated with colonoscopy, it is now also becoming a routine screening test for people 50 years of age or older. Subsequent rescreenings are then scheduled based on the initial results found, with a five- or ten-year recall being common for colonoscopies that produce normal results.

Details of the procedure

What do I need to do before this procedure?
Before the procedure, you will also be asked to go on a clear liquid diet for 1-2 days to help decrease the formation of any stools.
For a colonoscopy, the colon needs to be very clean. For this reason, on the day before the colonoscopy, a laxative and large quantity of fluid will be given to you. This will cause significant diarrhea that will clean the colon of any stools. A whole bowel irrigation may also be performed to clean the colon.

You may be asked to stop taking aspirin products or iron supplements 7 to 14 days before the test to avoid the risk of bleeding if a polypectomy is performed during the procedure. If you take blood-thinning medications regularly, discuss with your doctor how to manage your medication.

What happens on the day of the procedure?
Your surgeon will explain the procedure in detail, including possible complications and side effects. He may use an enema 30 to 60 minutes before the test to completely cleanse your colon.

What type of anesthesia will be used?
During the test, you may receive a pain medication and a sedative through an intravenous (IV) line in your arm or hand. These medications reduce pain and will make you feel relaxed and drowsy during the test. You may not remember much about the actual test.

What happens during colonoscopy, and how is it performed?
You will lie on your side with your knees drawn up toward your abdomen. Once you are in position, the doctor will first check for tenderness or blockage by inserting a gloved finger into your anus. Then, the colonoscope will be inserted and advanced while the intestinal lining of the colon will be examined through the scope. In some settings, the doctor may also view your abdomen on an X-ray screen (fluoroscope) to check the position of the colonoscope.

Your doctor will try to examine the entire length of your large intestine. As the colonoscope is withdrawn, extra care will be taken to examine the entire inner lining of your colon.

The doctor may also insert tiny instruments (forceps, loops, swabs) through the colonoscope to collect tissue samples (biopsy) or remove growths. The biopsy test is completely painless.

The test usually takes 30 to 45 minutes, but it may take longer, depending upon what is found and what is done during the test.

Why is a tissue sample collected during colonoscopy?
In some cases, a sample of tissue (biopsy) may be collected during the colonoscopy. In that case, it will be sent to a lab for further analysis. Samples of colon tissue are usually sent to a pathology lab, where they are examined under a microscope for evidence of certain diseases. Other samples of colon tissue may be sent to a microbiology lab to determine whether certain kinds of infection are present. Your doctor may be able to discuss some of the findings with you immediately after the procedure. Other results are usually available in 2 to 4 days. Tests for certain infections may take several weeks.

How long will I be in the hospital?
A colonoscopy is an outpatient procedure. After the test, you will be observed for 1 to 2 hours until the medications wear off. When you are fully recovered, you will be released from the hospital.

What precautions will I need to take after the procedure?
You will not be able to drive or operate machinery for 12 hours after the test. Your doctor will tell you when you can resume your usual diet and activities. Drink lots of liquids after the test to replace the fluids you may have lost while you were taking the laxative solution but do not drink alcohol.

What are the risks/complications associated with colonoscopy?
A colonoscopy is a very safe procedure that could be life saving. However, as with other procedures, there are some risks and complications attached with it.
• There is a slight risk that a tear or hole in the lining of the colon may occur. This is called gastrointestinal perforation and requires immediate major surgery for repair.
• There is also a slight risk of causing a colon infection.
• Bleeding may occur but such complications can be treated immediately during the procedure by cauterization via the instrument.
• Delayed bleeding may also occur at the site of polyp removal up to a week after the procedure and a repeat procedure can then be performed to treat the bleeding site.
• People who have certain types of heart murmurs, artificial heart valves, or previous infections of a heart valve will need antibiotics before and after the test to prevent infection. An irregular heartbeat may occur during the test but nearly always subsides on its own without treatment.
• Complications due to anesthesia include cardiopulmonary complications such as temporary drop in blood pressure and oxygen saturation.

What should I watch out for?
After the test, you may have bloating or crampy gas pains and may need to pass some gas. If a biopsy was done or a polyp removed, you may have traces of blood in your stool (feces) for a few days. If polyps were removed, you may be instructed to avoid taking aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 7 to 14 days after the test.
Be sure to call your doctor if any of the following symptoms appear:
• Heavy rectal bleeding
• Severe abdominal pain
• Fever
• Dizziness

Cost and availability

How much does it cost?
Click here for details.

Which countries/hospitals is it available in?
Click here to check the availability of colonoscopy with our partner hospitals.

Healthbase is a medical and dental tourism facilitator that connects patients to leading JCI/JCAHO/ISO accredited hospitals and dental offices overseas through a secure, high-tech, information-rich web portal. Healthbase provides a wide range of medical procedures through its partner hospital network. Over two hundred medical procedures are available in various categories: cosmetic and plastic, orthopedic, dental, cardiac, and many more. The savings are up to 80 percent from typical US prices even after adding up the travel costs, hospital stay and other related expenses. Healthbase offers more than just procedural availability; we also provide customers with extensive information on medical treatments, hospital and doctor profiles to help them make an educated decision regarding their treatment; travel planning and booking; applying for medical/dental loan and much more.

To learn more, visit http://www.healthbase.com and login to view our extensive hospital profiles including pictures of operating rooms, patient rooms, doctor qualifications, and lots more. Get a FREE quote now!!

Note: All information presented here has been obtained from publicly available medical resources and is here for reference purposes only. Healthbase does not claim to be a medical professional and does not provide any advice on any issues relating to medical treatment.

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Cholecystectomy

What is a cholecystectomy and why is it necessary?
Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, which is located in the abdomen beneath the right side of the liver. Gallbladder problems are usually the result of gallstones. These stones may block the flow of bile from your gallbladder, causing the organ to swell. Despite the development of non-surgical techniques, it is the most common method for treating symptomatic gallstones. Other reasons for having this surgery done include cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder), cholangitis (inflammation of the bile duct), gallbladder cancer and biliary dyskinesia (abnormal gallbladder function).

Each year more than 500,000 Americans have gallbladder surgery. Surgery options include the standard procedure, called laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and an older more invasive procedure, called open cholecystectomy.

What are the different types of cholecystectomy surgeries?
There are two methods of cholecystectomy: open surgery and laparoscopic surgery. Open surgery is the traditional way to removing the gallblader whereas laparoscopic surgery is the latest and minimally invasive way of doing it.

Details of the procedure

What do I need to do before the surgery?
Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for the procedure.

What happens on the day of surgery?
A nurse will review your chart and confirm that all the paperwork is in order. You will be taken to a pre-operative nursing unit where the anesthesiologist will start an IV. You will then be taken to the operating room. After the appropriate form of anesthesia is administered, surgery will be performed.

What type of anesthesia will be used?
Gallbladder removal is performed under general anesthesia, which will keep you asleep during the surgery.

What happens during surgery, and how is it performed?
If your surgery is performed laparoscopically, your surgeon will make three to four small incisions and insert tube-like instruments through them. The abdomen will be filled with gas to help the surgeon view the abdominal cavity. A camera will be inserted through one of the tubes. The camera sends a magnified image from inside the body to a video monitor, giving the surgeon a close-up view of the organs and tissues. Other instruments will be placed through the additional tubes. The surgeon watches the monitor and performs the operation by manipulating the surgical instruments through separate small incisions. The gallbladder is identified and carefully separated from the liver and other structures.

Finally, the cystic duct and the cystic artery are clipped with tiny titanium clips and cut, then the gallbladder is removed through one of the small incisions. This type of surgery requires meticulous surgical skill, but in straightforward cases can be done in about an hour.

If performed with the open method, a larger incision about 4 to 7 inches (10 to 18 cm) will be made in the abdomen through which the surgeon will remove the gallbladder.

How long will I be in the hospital?
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy does not require the abdominal muscles to be cut, resulting in less pain, quicker healing, improved cosmetic results, and fewer complications such as infection. Most patients can be discharged on the same or following day as the surgery.

However, after an open surgery, patients usually remain in the hospital for about 3 to 7 days.

What are the risks/complications associated with gallbladder removal?
As with any surgery, there are risks such as bleeding, infection, or an adverse reaction to anesthesia. Other risks include injury to the bile duct or the bowel. Your surgeon will inform you of the risks prior to surgery.

What should I watch out for?
Be sure to call your doctor if any of the following symptoms appear:
• Fever
• Worsening pain
• Redness or swelling around the incision
• The incision is warm to the touch
• Drainage from the incision

Will there be scar(s)?
If the procedure is performed laparoscopically the incisions should heal well, leaving small discrete scars. If the open method is used, a larger scar will be present.

When can I expect to return to work and/or resume normal activities?
Most patients can return to any type of occupation in about a week as there are no restrictions after laparoscopic gallbladder removal. You will be encouraged to return to normal activities such as showering, driving, walking up stairs, light lifting, and work as soon as you feel comfortable.

If you had an open surgery, you should not engage in heavy lifting or straining for six to eight weeks after the surgery.

Cost and availability

How much does it cost?
Click here for details.

Which countries/hospitals is it available in?
Click here to check the availability of cholecystectomy with our partner hospitals.

Healthbase is a medical and dental tourism facilitator that connects patients to leading JCI/JCAHO/ISO accredited hospitals and dental offices overseas through a secure, high-tech, information-rich web portal. Healthbase provides a wide range of medical procedures through its partner hospital network. Over two hundred medical procedures are available in various categories: cosmetic and plastic, orthopedic, dental, cardiac, and many more. The savings are up to 80 percent from typical US prices even after adding up the travel costs, hospital stay and other related expenses. Healthbase offers more than just procedural availability; we also provide customers with extensive information on medical treatments, hospital and doctor profiles to help them make an educated decision regarding their treatment; travel planning and booking; applying for medical/dental loan and much more.

To learn more, visit http://www.healthbase.com and login to view our extensive hospital profiles including pictures of operating rooms, patient rooms, doctor qualifications, and lots more. Get a FREE quote now!!

Note: All information presented here has been obtained from publicly available medical resources and is here for reference purposes only. Healthbase does not claim to be a medical professional and does not provide any advice on any issues relating to medical treatment.

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Shoulder Replacement

Provided by Wockhardt Hospital
Brought to you by Healthbase

Shoulder ReplacementSimilar to other joint replacement procedures, shoulder replacement surgery is generally done to address persistent pain that is not controlled by non-surgical therapy. Less commonly, poor shoulder motion may also be a reason for replacement surgery.

The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint, with the top of the arm bone (humeral head) fitting into a socket known as the glenoid. Muscles and tendons, such as the rotator cuff, help hold the joint in place. Surgery involves replacing the humeral head and the glenoid with artificial components. The humeral head replacement is generally made from a metal alloy, while the glenoid component is made from polyethylene plastic. The new components may be anchored by cement or press-fit into place so that the bone grows in around them.

During surgery, a three- to four-inch incision is made along the space between the arm and the collarbone. The procedure lasts about 90 minutes, and the incision is then closed with staples or stitches. Patients typically stay in the hospital for one to two nights, and full recovery usually takes six to 12 weeks.

 

Rehabilitation

 

Arthritic shoulders are stiff. One of the major goals of total shoulder replacement surgery is to relieve much of this stiffness. However, after surgery scar tissue will tend to recur and limit movement unless motion is started immediately. This early motion is facilitated by the complete surgical release of the tight tissues so that after surgery the patient has only to maintain the range of motion achieved at the operation. Later on, once the shoulder is comfortable and flexible, strengthening exercises and additional activities are started.

A careful, well-planned rehabilitation program is critical to the success of a shoulder replacement. You usually start gentle physical therapy on the first day after the operation. You wear an arm sling during the day for the first several weeks after surgery. You wear the sling at night for 4 to 6 weeks. Most patients are able to perform simple activities such as eating, dressing and grooming within 2 weeks after surgery. Driving a car is not allowed for 6 weeks after surgery.

Here are some “do’s and don’ts” for when you return home:

  • Don’t use the arm to push yourself up in bed or from a chair because this requires forceful contraction of muscles.

  • Do follow the program of home exercises prescribed for you. You may need to do the exercises 4 to 5 times a day for a month or more.

  • Don’t overdo it! If your shoulder pain was severe before the surgery, the experience of pain-free motion may lull you into thinking that you can do more than is prescribed. Early overuse of the shoulder may result in severe limitations in motion.

  • Don’t lift anything heavier than a glass of water for the first 6 weeks after surgery.

  • Do ask for assistance. Your physician may be able to recommend an agency or facility if you do not have home support.

  • Don’t participate in contact sports or do any repetitive heavy lifting after your shoulder replacement.

  • Do avoid placing your arm in any extreme position, such as straight out to the side or behind your body for the first 6 weeks after surgery.
    Many thousands of patients have experienced an improved quality of life after shoulder joint replacement surgery. They experience less pain, improved motion and strength, and better function

Frequently Asked Questions

 

What are the symptoms to detect Shoulder Replacement?

 

Patients with arthritis typically describe a deep ache within the shoulder joint. Initially, the pain feels worse with movement and activity, and eases with rest. As the arthritis progresses, the pain may occur even when you rest. By the time a patient sees a physician for the shoulder pain, he or she often has pain at night. This pain may be severe enough to prevent a good night’s sleep. The patient’s shoulder may make grinding or grating noises when moved. Or the shoulder may catch, grab, clunk or lock up. Over time, the patient may notice loss of motion and/or weakness in the affected shoulder. Simple daily activities like reaching into a cupboard, dressing, toileting and washing the opposite armpit may become increasingly difficult.

 

How do I know if I am ready for shoulder replacement surgery?

 

Patients who have tried the usual treatments for shoulder arthritis, but have not been able to find adequate relief, may be a candidate for shoulder replacement surgery. Patients considering the procedure should understand the potential risks of surgery, and understand that the goal of joint replacement is to alleviate pain. Patients generally find improved motion after surgery, but these improvements are not as consistent as the pain relief following shoulder replacement surgery.

 

How long is the recovery following shoulder replacement surgery?

 

Hospital stays vary from one to three days for most patients. You will be sent home wearing a sling and you should not attempt to use the arm except as specifically instructed by your doctor.

Most physicians will begin some motion immediately following surgery, but this may not be true in every case. Usually within two to three months, patients are able to return to most normal activities and place an emphasis on strengthening the muscles around the shoulder and maintaining range of motion.

 

What are the symptoms of severe arthritis of the shoulder?

 

Common symptoms of shoulder arthritis include:

  • Pain with activities

  • Limited range of motion

  • Stiffness of the shoulder

  • Swelling of the joint

  • Tenderness around the joint

  • A feeling of grinding or catching within the joint

Can rehabilitation be done at home?

 

In general the exercises are best performed by the patient at home. Occasional visits to the surgeon or therapist may be useful to check the progress and to review the program.

 

When can I return to ordinary daily activities?

 

In general, patients are able to perform gentle activities of daily living using the operated arm from two to six weeks after surgery. Walking is strongly encouraged. Driving should wait until the patient can perform the necessary functions comfortably and confidently. Recovery of driving ability may take six weeks if the surgery has been performed on the right shoulder, because of the increased demands on the right shoulder for shifting gears.

With the consent of their surgeon, patients can often return to activities such as swimming, golf and tennis at six months after their surgery.


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Unicondylar Knee Replacement

Provided by Wockhardt Hospital
Brought to you by Healthbase

Most people are aware of the total knee replacement surgery. This involves replacing the unhealthy surface of the entire knee joint with metal and plastic implants. It is a very successful operation with good long term results. However a large percentage of patients have arthritis limited to one part of the joint alone. Replacing the whole joint in these patients is overkill and unnecessary.

Knee ReplacementMany middle aged men and women develop osteoarthritis of the knee. Osteoarthritis of the knee affects the inner half or medial compartment to start with and then proceeds to affect the outer half or lateral compartment.

In this operation only that part of the knee, which is unhealthy, is replaced. The normal surfaces are left alone. This operation has several advantages over total knee replacement surgery.

  • It can be done through a very small incision.

  • It is minimally invasive and hence tissue damage is far less.

  • The patient gets complete pain relief and the implant lasts long

  • The knee feels more natural as ligaments are preserved

  • Range of movement is full and it allows squatting and sitting crosslegged

  • Post operative hospitalization is reduced and return to normal is much faster than total knee replacement surgery.

Dr. Kaushal Malhan is a Joint Replacement and sports surgeon at the Wockhardt hospital. He was the first surgeon in India to do the mobile bearing oxford unicompartmental knee replacement and has been in the forefront in the field of full bending knee replacement surgery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

  • What is unicondylar arthroplaty, or partial knee replacement?
  • What are the advantages unicondylar arthroplasty?
  • How is it different from total knee replacement?
  • You mentioned recovery is faster. What does that mean?
  • What does the surgeon do during a unicondylar arthroplasty?
  • How do I know if I am a candidate for this surgery?
What is unicondylar arthroplaty, or partial knee replacement?Partial knee replaces only the area of the knee that is worn out, sparing patients the more medically complicated and involved total knee replacement surgery.

 

What are the advantages unicondylar arthroplasty?With a partial knee replacement, there is a dramatically shorter recovery time due to less surgical trauma, less scarring and fuller range of motion.

 

How is it different from total knee replacement?

During total knee replacement, surgeons typically make a 7 to 8-inch incision over the knee, patients stay in the hospital for approximately four days, and there is a recovery period of up to three months. During minimally-invasive partial knee surgery, a part of the knee to be replaced through a small, 3-inch incision. There is minimal damage to the muscles and tendons around the knee and the required hospital stay is up to two days. The recovery period is about one month.

 

Total Knee Replacement

 

You mentioned recovery is faster. What does that mean?

Patients often walk unassisted within a week or two of the operation. Even those who have both knees done at once are able to walk without the assistance of a walker or cane fairly quickly.

 

What does the surgeon do during a unicondylar arthroplasty?When a knee replacement is performed, some bone and cartage are removed using precise instruments to create exact surfaces to accommodate a metal and plastic prostheses.

 

How do I know if I am a candidate for this surgery?

Candidates for this surgery are generally younger, more active patients. The partial knee replacement allows for symptoms of pain or discomfort. The procedure allows younger patients to buy time before they need a full knee replacement. The procedure is also effective for older patients if they have disease localized to one half of the joint.

 


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What is Hip Resurfacing?

Provided by Wockhardt Hospital
Brought to you by Healthbase

Hip ResurfacingHip Resurfacing or Surface Replacement Arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to conventional Total Hip Replacement (THR). Unlike THR, hip Resurfacing does not involve the removal of the femoral head and neck nor removal of bone from the femur. Rather, the head, neck and femur bone is preserved in an effort to facilitate future surgery should it be necessary and to enable the patient to take advantage of newer technology or treatments in the future. The current generation of hip Resurfacing devices utilize a metal bearings have demonstrated a much higher level of wear resistance as well as reduced bone loss and inflammatory tissue reaction about the hip joint as compared to metal-polyethylene bearings.

Hip Resurfacing is anatomically and biomechanically more similar to the natural hip joint resulting in increased stability, flexibility and range of motion. Further, dislocation risk is virtually eliminated. Higher activity levels are typically achieved with less risk. These benefits are realized because the head diameter that results from Resurfacing is very similar to the patient’s normal head diameter and these larger head sizes are typically much larger than the femoral balls utilized in conventional THR.

Advantages of Hip Resurfacing:

  1. Allows the patient to squat and sit on the floor safely

  2. Allows a normal range of movement and sporting activities after operation

  3. Sacrifices only the diseased bone and preserves normal bone

  4. Restores the normal structures of the hip

  5. More natural feel after surgery

  6. Early rehabilitation

  7. Easy to revise if needed

  8. Less risk of dislocation

  9. No leg length alteration

 

Know the physiology of Human Hip

The normal hip joint consists of a ball rotating inside a socket. The ball is called the head of the femur and the socket in the pelvis is called the Acetabulum. The surface of the femoral head and the acetabulum (i.e. the ball and the socket) is covered by a protective layer of cartilage ( the white lining seen in the pic). This makes the joint smooth and reduces friction during movements. It covers and protects the bone like the rubber of a car tyre.

Any condition that damages the Cartilage will lead to pain, dysfunction and eventually arthritis. Cartilage can get damaged due to a number of reasons including Injury, Infection, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Avascular Necrosis ( loss of blood supply to bone), Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Developmental problem like bone Dysplasias, slipped upper femoral epiphyses etc.

Frequently Asked Questions

 

  • Is this a minimally invasive?
  • Do I need blood transfusion during the surgery?
  • Is it a very painful operation?
  • When do we remove the stitches and is it very painful?
  • How long do I have to stay in hospital?
  • When can I start walking and climbing stairs after the operation?
  • Do I need lots of physiotherapy after surgery?
  • Will I be able to sit on the floor after surgery?
  • What is the ASR/BHR?
  • What is the advantage of Hip Resurfacing over conventional total hip replacement?
  • Are there any implants used ?

 

Is this a minimally invasive?
This operation can be done by a minimally invasive approach and the invasion can be kept to less than 10cms. The operation also involves minimal damage to bone.

 

Do I need blood transfusion during the surgery?
We generally do not need blood transfusions during the operation.

 

Is it a very painful operation?
Pain control techniques and minimal injury to soft tissue and bone during surgery help to keep the patients comfortable in the post operative period.

 

When do we remove the stitches and is it very painful?
Absorbable sutures are used. These need not to be removal. The patient does not have to follow up for up to 60 years after discharge from hospital.

 

How long do I have to stay in hospital?
Local patients are discharged four days after the operation, but overseas patients may have to stay for 8-10 days after surgery.

 

When can I start walking and climbing stairs after the operation?
Most patients start walking with support on the second postoperative day after removal of the drain. Our team of physiotherapist takes you through a standardized protocol of mobilization and stair climbing is achieved before discharge.

 

Do I need lots of physiotherapy after surgery?
The amount of physiotherapy needed depends on the condition of your joint and muscles before the operation. Most patients do not need much suppressed physiotherapy.

Will I be able to sit on the floor after surgery?
Yes, this surgery will allow you to do that safely unless another problem prevents it.

What is the ASR/BHR?
Hip resurfacing or surface replacement arthroplasty uses specialized implants that are fixed into the bone .Two international companies sell such implants in India at present.

a)Smith and Nephew (MMT) – (BHR) Birmingham Hip Resurfacing.
b)Johnson and Johnson – (ASR) Articular Surface Replacement.

What is the advantage of Hip Resurfacing over conventional total hip replacement?
Conventional Total Hip Replacements usually consist of a long metal component that is fixed into the femur (thigh bone) articulating with a polyethylene cup cemented into the pelvis.

Conventional hip replacements sacrifice a large quantity of normal bone. The very nature of fixation of these implants causes progressive bone loss due to stress shielding. The problem of bone loss gets compounded by osteolysis due to polyethylene debris from the cup. All these reduce the bone stock and make any future revision procedures difficult. The polyethylene cups gradually thin down due to wear and need replacing. The head of the femoral component is small in diameter, so as to reduce friction at the cost of stability. This increases the risk of hip dislocation i.e. hip coming out of joint

Problems with Conventional Total Hip Replacement:

  1. Bone loss

  2. Increased risk of dislocation

  3. Cannot squat or sit on the floor without the risk of dislocating the hip

  4. Range of movement is less

  5. Cannot safely indulge in sporting activities

  6. Revision Surgery difficult

  7. Feels less like a normal natural hip

  8. Possibility of change in leg length after surgery

 

Are there any implants used?
Modern techniques allow us to replace the diseased human hip with artificial implants which ensure near normal movements and function. Huge advances have been made in terms of the materials, the method of fixation and structure of these implants. The purpose of all these changes is to increase the longevity, reduce complication rate and improved function after surgery. Hip Resurfacing (bone conserving hip replacement (BHR), surface replacement ) with a metal-on-metal articulation is another step in this direction.


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