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Following is the top ten surgeon in India, in the five most common surgical specialities: heart, orthopaedic, neurosurgery, ophthalmic surgery and reconstructive surgery from HindustanTimes article.

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NEUROSURGERY
Dr Vipul Gupta, 41, Head, Neuro-intervention, Medanta – The Medicity

Vipul Gupta watched his 33-year-old brother die of a malignant tumour in the brain eight years ago. “We knew it was hopeless but we went all the way. He was operated on thrice, at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in India and Cleveland Clinic in Ohio and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. That’s when I realised that even when the chips are down, the family does not give up, so you have to give it your best,” says the Delhi-based Gupta. He’s a little embarrassed about the emotional outpouring. “Surgeons can’t be emotional, it won’t help the patient on the table. You have to be calm and think clearly,” he says. At 41, Gupta heads neuro-intervention at Medanta – the Medicity, where he moved after doing his MBBS from Delhi’s Maulana Azad Medial College in 1996 and training in neuro-radiology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) for three years. “I’m out-doorsy and enjoy swimming, rafting and rock-climbing. I broke my knees twice in school. The operation and forced bed-rest for six months slowed me down, forcing me to study which helped me crack the MBBS easily,” he laughs.

Dr Deepak Agrawal, 40, Associate professor, Neurosurgery, AIIMS
He’s the guy at the frontier, treating accident victims at the AIIMS Trauma Centre, best known for treating some of the bloodiest and most bizarre accident cases in the country. “Most accident victims we get are people with severe head or spinal injuries that are often fatal. It does get you down, but nothing can beat the high of seeing a patient everyone including your colleagues had given up on, walk into your clinic for a follow-up. That’s when you know that miracles do happen,” says Dr Agrawal. Agrawal did his MBBS at the University College of Medical Science in 1994 – where he met his onco-surgeon wife Swati – and his training in neurosurgery at AIIMS. “My professional high was being awarded the ‘Young Neurosurgeon of the Year’ Award by the American Congress of Neurosurgeons in 2008. The personal one was my daughter Ayushi, who is five,” he says. His father Dr Ved Prakash was also a neurosurgeon at AIIMS, so Agrawal’s becoming a surgeon was almost pre-determined. “I like to catch up on my emails before breakfast, so I begin work at 5.30 am. I leave home at 7.30, doing rounds of the ward for three hours, which is followed by surgeries that usually go on till 7. Then come the evening rounds, which finish at 9 pm. Add to this administrative work, teaching and writing and correcting research papers, and my day never seems to end,” says Agrawal.

OPHTHALMIC SURGERY
Sri Ganesh, 44, Eye surgeon and chairman, Nethradhama Hospital, Bangalore

Bangalore residents are used to seeing Dr Sri Ganesh zooming down the streets to his farm on his Suzuki Intruder, which he exchanges for his Audi Q7 or BMW 5-Series when he visits the hospitals he set up. “Both my grandmas were blinded with cataract, one because of a botched up surgery. I think seeing them faltering around the house made me decide I wanted to do all I could to help people see,” says the 44-year-old. Eye surgery techniques have become much safer now. “Back then, there were no intraocular lenses (artificial lenses put inside the eye in place of the natural ones) and the failure rate of a simple cataract surgery was 30 per cent, largely due to infection. Now, less than 0.1 per cent cataract and vision-correction surgeries have complications,” he says. Sri Ganesh met his wife Sumanshree at a paratrooping camp in Agra. He was 17, she was 16. “Someone stole my things and she was very sweet,” he says. They married six years later, in 1990, after Sri Ganesh did his MBBS. The couple have three children, Supriya, Sushant and Skanda. Apart from running six hospitals – four in Bangalore, one in Mysore and one in Mangalore – Sri Ganesh runs a 90-bedded charitable hospital in Padmanabhanagar that does 8,000 free cataract surgeries a year.

Dr Mahipal S Sachdev, 52, Centre for Sight Group of Hospitals

Mahipal S Sachdev, eye surgeon to the rich and powerful, never invests in anything but health. “My last investment was Harshad Mehta and I burnt my fingers there,” says Dr Sachdev. His investments in healthcare – time, energy and money – have shown better results. Sachdev was told he was crazy when he quit as associate professor at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) to join the newly-opened Indraprastha Apollo Hospital in Delhi in 1996. He was 37. The skeptics got it very, very wrong. Within 15 years of that, he’s running 17 eye hospitals that have become one-stop shops for eye disorders in north India. A year-long fellowship to Georgetown University in Washington DC in ’89-’90 opened his eyes, literally, to the technological imaging and surgical revolution happening in the field of ophthalmology. “I realised less invasive radical surgeries were the way forward, but I needed equipment and trained staff for that. I could not get that in a government set-up. So I set up my own centre, which started in a 8×10 foot room in Safdarjang Enclave in 1996, but we’ve grown a little since then,” he says with obvious pride. Sachdev is arguably the best person to go to for cataract and lasik surgery in India. “This is all I want to do, medicine is in my genes. My mother and brother are doctors, so is my wife Alka and daughters Ritika, 29, and Gitansha, 25,” says Sachdev. Sachdev also has an unexplored, fun side to him. “I did my MBBS from AIIMS, where I was the secretary of the students’ union. We were the ones who threw open Pulse, the students’ festival at AIIMS, to fashion, jam sessions and music. Before that, it was a sporting event. We made it socio-cultural,” he says.

COSMETIC SURGERY
Sunil Choudhary, 42, Aesthetic and Reconstructive surgeon, Max Speciality Hospital, Delhi
Quite like modern day Dr Frankensteins, attaching a hand and replacing chopped fingers with toes is all in a day’s work for reconstructive surgeons. Some, like Sunil Choudhary, who head the aesthetics and reconstruction at Max Speciality Hospital, start a conversation with, “Today, I attached two toes and one finger in the right hand of a 16-year-old who’d lost his fingers in a farming accident. He’ll be able to write now”. This is followed by an MMS of a surgery to fix a congenital defect in which a child’s skull stops expanding naturally, squeezing the brain and making it bulge out of the forehead. Unlike popular perception, silicone implants and other cosmetic procedures make up less than a third of a cosmetic surgeon’s case load. “A lot of what we do is related to reconstruction after cancer surgeries and accident cases, including burns and acid attacks,” he explains. Choudhary grew up in Delhi, went to school in DPS RK Puram and did his MBBS from Maulana Azad Medical College, after which he joined the training programme of the UK’s National Health Service.

Dr Shahin Nooreyezdan, 49, Plastic & reconstructive surgeon, Indraprastha Apollo

He insists on giving you a business card. “I’m the only one in the world with this name, so people often get it wrong,” says Dr Shahin Nooreyezdan. There is, however, a little boy called Shahin Sharma, who was called Golu before his grateful parents renamed him after the surgeon who reattached his finger. “It was deeply touching, but also strange. I guess now there’s another person in the world with a very unusual name,” he says. Nooreyezdan grew up in Mumbai, where he lived with his parents in a flat above Russi J Manekshaw, the granddaddy of plastic surgery in India. “Each day, I’d walk past his door on my way home from school and pass this display box with before- and after-surgery pictures, which kept changing every week. I was hooked and decided this was what I wanted to do,” says the Delhi-based Nooreyezdan. He moved to London in 1996, where he worked at St Andrew’s Hospital for three years and met his wife Neda, a British citizen. “When we decided to move back and I went to the Indian High Commission for a visa for my wife, the clerk there said, why are you going? You have a great future here!” he laughs. Most of his work in India is reconstruction. “Unlike other surgeons who can walk in to do the critical part of the surgery, I have to be there from the first incision to the final stitch because what I do is for everyone to see,” says Nooreyezdan, who gets women as young as 19 who need reconstruction after breast cancer surgery. The deft fingers that reconstruct tissues and reattach blood vessels 1.2-1.5 mm in diameter also help him pursue his hobby: collecting and repairing antique clocks. Nooreyezdan has a collection of over 125 pendulum clocks from all over the world, including grandfather clocks from the UK, clocks from ships and railway stations. “It started when I was 17, when I noticed an old, broken, clock at an Irani dhaba. I bought it for R170, got it home and fixed it. I still do it, though I have to pay a guy to wind them up in rotation once a week,” he says. He clearly knows how to wind down.

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Dr Vijay C Bose, 44, Head of orthopaedic surgery, Apollo Chennai
He was part of British orthopaedic surgeon Derek McMinn’s crack team that developed the ‘Birmingham Hip’ – a hip implant that allows people to play contact sports and twist without shouting after a hip transplant – in the late ’90s. Yet what gives Dr Vijay Bose the greatest joy is recognition from his peers. “Three weeks ago, a renowned joint replacement surgeon from the US got his son to our centre for surgery. He’s one of the best in the world and could have done it himself, he could have got it done by the best in his own country, but he still came to India. That’s the quality India offers to the world now,” says Bose. Bose, who joined Apollo Hospital in Chennai in 2000 after six years in Birmingham and Liverpool in the UK, now routinely gets so many patients from overseas that he’s became the face of medical tourism in India for 60 Minutes on CBS News. “I did the first implant in Apollo in 2000 and since then, I have demonstrated the technique across 80 hospitals in India,” says Bose, who did his MBBS from Madras Medical College in 1990. Apart from hip replacement, he does knee and shoulder joint reconstructions.

Dr Suraj Guruv, 36, Orthopaedic surgeon, Asian Heart Institute, Mumbai
Dr Suraj Guruv’s last holiday was spent shooting wildlife at Bandhavgarh National Park in Madhya Pradesh, but he did not break any laws. Guruv is an amateur photographer and rarely leaves home without his Nikon Digital SLR. “I’m crazy about wildlife photography,” he says. When he’s not shooting, Guruv is fixing damaged hips and knees using minimally invasive bone-conserving surgeries in India that make it possible for people to run, drive and work just as they did before, after hip or knee replacements. Guruv is a Mumbai boy, who grew up in Prabhadevi, went to a neighbourhood school, did his MBBS at Mumbai’s Topiwala National Medical College and worked in Bombay Hospital before going to train in Singapore General Hospital. “I belong to a family of chartered accountants, my dad is one, so is my older brother. So when dad said try something else, I thought, why not?” says Guruv, who aced his entrance exam. “Even though I don’t invest in the markets, I still follow financial news very closely, perhaps because that’s what I’ve grown up hearing,” he says. He returned to India because he wanted to be part of the boom in medical care that India is witnessing. “We now have medical facilities at par with any other in the world, with better care,” he says.

HEART SURGERY
Dr Raja Joshi, 40  Paediatric cardiac surgeon, Apollo
He’s called the ‘bandana guy’ because he wears a bandana instead of a surgical cap while operating. Apart from his training as a paediatric heart surgeon during a five-year stint at Cleveland Clinic in the US, what defines Raja Joshi is his bandana collection. “You have to strike a chord with the kids you’re treating, and a bandana with Dalmatians on it sure helps to break the ice,” says the Delhi-based Joshi who, at 36, became one of the youngest surgeons in the country to set up a paediatric cardiac surgery unit in a major hospital. “My dad was in the air force, I grew up wanting to be a fighter pilot. It was after my class 10 boards that my dad told me there were other ways to earn a living,” he recalls. The idea of being a heart surgeon for children came a year later, after a Doordarshan show on a hole-in-the-heart being fixed. “It was so dramatic, the lights and the surgeons in scrubs, this child being immersed in ice to bring the body temperature down. Suddenly, that was the only thing I wanted to do,” says Joshi. He’s had no regrets. “It’s one of the few surgeries where the patients outlive the surgeons. You won’t believe the number of birthday invites I get. Anyone can do adult heart surgery, paediatric is what separates the boys from the men,” said Joshi. His wife Reena Joshi, 36, is a paediatric anaesthetist who’s helped him introduce innovations such as letting the mother stay with the child in the operation room till he sleeps. “Taking away a baby from the mother makes anxiety levels shoot up. Keeping them together till the baby is anaesthetised improves surgery outcomes,” says Joshi.

Pranav Kandachar, 37, Paediatric heart surgeon, Asian Heart Institute, Mumbai
Heart surgery is one of the cleanest surgeries there is, it’s like mathematics. The result is directly related to what you do, there are few surprises,” says Pranav Kandachar, the newest heart surgeon to join Asian Heart Institute’s team of surgeons. “Of course, there are some conditions in which you cannot play god, but in most cases, children can lead active, normal lives after surgery,” he says. After doing his MBBS from Bangalore Medical College in 1997, Kandachar worked at Sion in Mumbai, Apollo Chennai and Colombo, did a year long stint in New Zealand, returned to Bangalore to work at Shirdi Sai Baba Charitable Hospital, and joined the Asian Heart Institute, Mumbai, in January this year. “When you’re training, one institute can’t offer you everything. I’ve trained with the best,” he says. Kandachar describes himself as a nature kind of guy, being big time into hydroponics, a scientific method of growing plants in water – without soil – using mineral nutrient solutions. “I have a virtual vegetable garden in my little balcony, where I grow spinach, beans, cauliflower, coriander and mint. I’m planning to grow strawberries next,” he says. He’s also into ornithology and is part of a nature club that goes birdwatching to sanctuaries at least once a month.

Source: HindustanTimes, April 10

An excellent article appeared recently in Dallas News that talked about the health care systems in other Western countries and what America can learn from them to resolve its health care woes. Here is the article for a good read…

Tackling the high cost of health care is politically bruising and difficult work around the world. Among developed countries, only the Norwegians rival our level of spending. The French wrestle with rising costs every year. The Canadians are searching for a better model, and have had their eyes on France. But for all their troubles, the French and the Canadians – two bogeymen in the American reform debate – spend much less and live longer than we Americans.

In the last five years, I’ve spent time reporting on health care in 10 other countries to see what they might offer in the way of suggestions to improve the American way of medicine. No one has a perfect system. No one has a permanent solution. But medical spending can be slowed without sacrificing quality. Some do it with government price controls and government doctors, while some do it with government acting as a referee. Neither approach is fatal to medical quality.

The Swiss, the French and the Canadians all use very different approaches to get at the problem, but they get there. And when all else fails, there’s still medical tourism. You can get heart bypass surgery, with a tour of the Taj Mahal, in India for less than 10 percent of the U.S. cost – plus a year’s supply of pharmaceuticals.

I met Carlo Gislimberti, a New Mexico restaurateur, in New Delhi in 2005 while he was waiting for a coronary bypass at the Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre. He’d had three heart attacks. He had no health insurance. His Albuquerque hospital wanted $120,000 for the operation.

Escorts did the job for less than $12,000.

“It was an absolutely wonderful experience with wonderful results,” Gislimberti said last week when I called him in Santa Fe.

“There was only one thing – the luxury is not there. But the knowledge, the quality of nursing, it was absolutely beyond belief. … I would still today recommend to all the people in my predicament to go abroad.”

Medical tourism is no longer a quirky answer for the desperate and uninsured. The health-consulting arm of Deloitte estimates 1.6 million Americans will seek medical treatment in another country this year. U.S. health insurers, looking for ways to lower costs, are exploring policies that cover such travel.

Gislimberti, now 64, sold his restaurant and paints for a living. His heart ailments qualified him for disability under Social Security, and last year he was accepted under Medicare. He had a pacemaker installed by his Albuquerque hospital in an operation last May.

One thing he learned: “If you have insurance, this country is the greatest. But it you don’t have insurance, this is a Third World country.”

Another lesson: Price competition is coming. A study by the McKinsey Global Institute consulting group last fall found that Americans pay 50 percent to 60 percent higher charges for pharmaceuticals, health insurance overhead and physician services than anyone else in the world. That could make medical tourism irresistible, and a competitive risk to the U.S. medical establishment.

Switzerland is intriguing because employers have gotten out of the insurance business. The Swiss government mandates personal health insurance. Everyone shops among scores of insurance companies to buy a policy. The insurers must offer everyone a basic policy and can’t exclude anyone. The government offers subsidies to people who can’t afford a policy, and fines people who don’t get one.

Swiss medical fees are set in annual negotiations between health care providers and insurers that must win the approval of the canton parliament. (Insurers and hospital chains do the same thing here, but those negotiations are seldom among equals and don’t have a referee like the canton parliament.)

One result of the Swiss approach is that consumers gravitate toward high-deductible policies – insurance that costs less per month, but takes more out of your wallet when you see a doctor. And because they’re paying for it, the Swiss are more cost-conscious health consumers. The Swiss spend about a third less than Americans for medical care.

France and Canada both have national health insurance. In France, this is like Medicare for all. There’s a gap of 30 percent to 40 percent between what the government insurance covers and what health care costs, so a lively market exists for private, supplemental insurance policies.

Doctors can choose compensation under a government schedule revised every year, or they can charge what they like – and forgo a government pension.

Canadians may, famously, wait for nonurgent treatments and surgeries. But they’re quicker to rally around a public health issue like obesity, because the insurance mechanism is part of the provincial government.

“Our wait lists are coming down, but they’re still substantially more than yours,” said Canadian health economist Steven Lewis. “But your system is twice as expensive. It doesn’t insure 45 million people, it underinsures another 45 million, and overall you have a less healthy population. Is that worth sustaining?”

In the current health care debate in Washington, no one argues that we should throw out the U.S. health care model for an import. There are models closer to home – like Temple’s Scott & White – worth emulating.

But there are plenty of places that spend less for equal or better care. It can be done.

By Jim Landers

Further reading:
Medical tourism
Domestic medical tourism
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Breast Augumentation

Provided by Wockhardt Hospital
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If you have any or some of the underlying conditions, you may want to consider the option of breast reduction

  • your breasts appear too small in proportion to your body frame
  • often clothes that fit well around your hips are too large at the bustline
  • wearing a swimsuit or form- fitting top makes you feel self-conscious
  • post childbirth your breasts have become smaller and lost their firmness
  • weight loss has changed the size and shape of your breasts
  • one of your breasts is noticeably smaller than the other

During the consultation, you will be asked to point out the exact areas which you would like to see improved. This would include your desired breast size as well as anything else about your breasts that you would like to see improved. This will help your plastic surgeon to understand your expectations and determine whether they can realistically be achieved.

BREAST AUGMENTATION SURGERY EVALUATION

 

After examining your breasts, your plastic surgeon may perhaps take photographs for your medical record. In case, your breasts are sagging, a breast lift may be recommended in conjunction with augumentation.

A detailed medical history is very important, especially family history of breast cancer and previous mammograms.

No scientific evidence suggests that breast augmentation increases the risk of breast cancer. However, the presence of breast implants makes it more technically difficult to take and read mammograms. Especially, for women who perhaps because of their family history or other reasons are at higher risk for breast cancer.

Any plans to lose a significant amount of weight must be discussed with your plastic surgeon. You may be advised by your plastic surgeon to stabilize your weight prior to undergoing surgery.

Any plans of pregnancy in future, should be mentioned to your surgeon. Pregnancy can have an effect on the long-term results of your breast augmentation as it can alter your breast size in an unpredictable way. There is no evidence that pregnancy or your ability to breast-feed will be affected by breast implants, but any queries about these matters should be discussed with your plastic surgeon.

 

PREPARATION FOR SURGERY

Quite frequently, your plastic surgeon may recommend a baseline mammogram before surgery and another mammographic examination some months after surgery.

You will be asked to stop smoking well in advance of surgery if you smoke. Increased
bleeding can be caused by aspirin and certain anti-inflammatory drugs. It is therefore recommended that you avoid taking these medications for a period of time before surgery. Your surgeon will provide you with additional pre-operative instructions as well.

Breast augmentation is usually performed on an outpatient basis. Going home after a few hours may be permitted, unless you and your plastic surgeon have determined that you will stay in the hospital or surgical facility overnight.

 

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The contents or materials provided in this website are for general information only and are not intended as medical advice.

 

 

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Breast Reduction

Provided by Wockhardt Hospital
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WHO NEED BREAST REDUCTION?
 

If you have any or some of the underlying conditions, you may want to consider the option of breast reduction –

 

  • your breasts appear too large in proportion to your body frame
  • heavy, pendulous breasts having nipples and areolas pointed downward
  • one breast is much larger than the other
  • weight of your breasts cause pain in back, neck or shoulder
  • skin irritation beneath your breasts
  • tight bra straps resulting in indentations in your shoulders
  • size and weight of your breasts restrict the physical activity
  • the largeness of your breasts resulting in dissatisfaction or self-consciousness

During the consultation, you will be asked to point out the exact areas which you would like to see improved. This would include your desired breast size as well as anything else about your breasts that you would like to see improved.

This will help your plastic surgeon to understand your expectations and determine whether they can realistically be achieved.

Subsequent childbirth and breast feeding must be discussed with your surgeon.

 
BREAST REDUCTION SURGERY EVALUATION
 

After examining your breasts, your plastic surgeon will perhaps take measurements & photographs for your medical record. Factors like the size and shape of your breasts, the quality of your skin, and the placement of the nipples and areolas will be carefully evaluated.

A detailed medical history will be taken. Past and future weight loss should also be discussed.

 
HOW BREAST REDUCTION SURGERY IS PERFORMED
 

Quite frequently three incisions are involved in the method of reducing the breasts. The first incision is made around the areola. The second runs vertically from the bottom edge of the areola to the crease underneath the breast. The third incision follows the natural curve of the breast crease.

After the excess breast tissue, fat and skin have been removed by the surgeon, the nipple and areola are shifted to a higher position. Liposuction might be employed to improve the contour under the arm.

Generally, since the nipples and areolas remain attached to underlying mounds of tissue, the preservation of sensation is retained. This method might help to retain the ability to breast-feed, although this cannot be guaranteed.

Rarely, in case of extremely large breasts, the nipples and areolas may need to be completely detached before they are shifted to a higher level. In such cases, you may have to decide to sacrifice sensation and the possibility of breast-feeding in order to achieve your desired breast size.

UNDERSTANDING RISKS
 

A few potential complications that may be discussed with you would include bleeding, infection and reactions to anesthesia.

Post Reduction, it is possible that the breasts may not be perfectly symmetrical or the nipple height may vary slightly.

Desired minor adjustments, if any, can be made at a later time. In rare cases, permanent loss of sensation in the nipples or breasts may occur. In certain instances where incisions may have healed poorly, Revisionary Surgery is sometimes helpful.
In the case of injury to or loss of the nipple and areola which is usually an unlikely event, they usually can be satisfactorily reconstructed using skin grafts.

Following the advice and instructions of your plastic surgeon, both pre and post surgery is advisable as it can help to lessen certain risks.

A detailed information booklet will be provided with instructions and precautions for the immediate and early postoperative period.

This will also discuss the sequelae of Breast Reduction Surgery.

HOW WOULD THE INITIAL LOOK AND FEEL BE?
 

In the post surgery days, you will be encouraged to get out of bed for short periods of time. After considerable time, more comfortable movement will be possible.

Surgical drains, if any, will be removed in a day or two after surgery. At the same time your dressings may also be changed or removed. Wearing a support bra for a few weeks will be instructed. This has to be continued until the swelling and discoloration of your breasts diminishes. Generally, stitches will be removed in stages beginning about one week after surgery. You may realize that you feel less sensation in the nipple and areola areas, which is usually temporary. For sensation to return to normal it may take weeks, months or even more than a year. Your breasts may also require some time to assume a more natural shape. Incisions will initially be red or pink in color and will remain this way for many months following surgery.

BREAST REDUCTION & LIFT are in locations easily concealed by clothing, even low-cut necklines.

 
WHEN CAN MY NORMAL ACTIVITIES BE RESUMED?
 

Post breast reduction surgery, it is often possible to resume work within just a couple of weeks, depending upon your job. Quite often, you can resume most of your normal activities, including some of your mild exercises, after several weeks.

Experiencing some mild periodical discomfort during this time might persist, but such feelings are normal. Severe pains should be reported to your doctor.

Any sexual activity should be abstained from for a minimum of one week. Your plastic surgeon might advise you to wait longer. After that you must be extremely gentle with your breasts for at least the next six weeks.

 
HOW LONG WILL THE RESULTS LAST?
 

Your breast size should remain fairly constant unless you gain or loose a significant amount of weight or become pregnant. However natural factors like gravity and aging will eventually affect the size and shape of virtually every woman’s breasts.

But certainly without the excessive weight of large breasts, you may discover greater enjoyment in playing sports and engaging in physical activity.

Incisions from your breast reductions surgery will heal and fade over time. It is important to realvize, however, that the incision lines will be permanently visible, more so in some individuals that others. Fortunately the incisions for breast reduction are in locations easily concealed in clothing, even low-cut necklines.

 

 

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Abdominoplasty(Tummy Tuck)

Provided by Wockhardt Hospital
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WHO NEED ABDOMINOPLASTY ?
 

If you have any or some of the underlying conditions, you may want to consider this option.

 

  • abdominal skin that is excess or sagging
  • a protruding abdomen that is out of proportion to the rest of your body
  • abdominal muscles that have been separated and weakened
  • excess fatty tissue that is concentrated in your abdomen

Any plans of pregnancy in future or of losing a significant amount of weight must be discussed with your plastic surgeon. Any resultant scarring from previous abdominal surgery may limit the results of your Abdominoplasty.

The surgeon will examine you and consider factors like the amount of excess skin and the state of your abdominal muscles.

These will determine the exact procedure that you will need.

POST SURGERY / PRE SURGERY RESULTS

Your firmer and flatter abdomen will enhance your body contour as a result of Abdominoplasty. Wearing certain styles of clothing will be easier and comfortable. You will be more confident about your appearance.

The incisions from the procedure will heal and fade over time. However, one needs to understand that the incision lines will be permanently visible. In a few cases they may eventually be only faint lines. Certain individuals may have incision lines that are more noticeable. Fortunately, the incisions for your Abdominoplasty are usually in locations concealed by most bathing suits and undergarments.

Wearing a support garment for several weeks may be instructed.
Your abdomen should remain firmer and flatter for many years subject to your gaining or losing a significant amount of weight or becoming pregnant. However, factors like gravity and the effects of aging will eventually take their toll.

In case, after a few years, you again become dissatisfied with the appearance of your abdomen, you may choose to undergo a second procedure to restore a more youthful body contour.

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CT – Scan

Provided by Escorts Heart Institute
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CT (Computed Tomography) is a diagnostic test that combines the use of x-rays with computer technology. A series of x-rays beams from different angles around the body are used to show cross sectional images of the patient’s body. The images so obtained are assembled in a computer into a three- dimensional picture that can display organs, bones & tissues in great detail.

In spiral CT the examination table advances at a constant rate through the scanner gantry. While the x-ray tube rotates continuously around the patient, tracing a spiral path through the patient. This spiral path gathers continuous data with no gaps between images.

CT Angiography (CTA) is an examination that is used to visualize blood vessels in many areas of the body including the brain, kidneys, pelvis and the arteries serving the lungs. Compared to catheter angiography, which involves injecting contrast medium into an artery CTA is much less invasive & a more patient friendly procedure; contrast medium is injected into a vein rather than an artery.

Why is it done?
CT imaging offers detailed views of different types of tissue, including the lung, bones, soft tissues and blood vessels Using specialized equipment & expert technician to create CT scans of the body , radiologists can more easily diagnose problems such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases ,infectious diseases, trauma & musculoskeletal disorders.

How is it done?
Patient is asked to change into a gown before the examination & to remove jewellery, eyeglasses and metal objects depending on the part of the body that is being scanned.

The CT technician begins by positioning the patient on the CT table. The patient’s body is supported by the safety straps & is asked to lie very still and follow the instructions of the technician while the scanning is being performed. During the scanning, the technician can see, hear & speak to the patient at all times.

A CT examination often requires the use of different contrast agents to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. The contrast agent may be injected directly into the blood stream, swallowed or administered by enema, depending on the type of examination. Before administering the contrast agent the radiologist or technician will ask whether the patient has any allergies, especially to medications, iodine and whether the patient has a history of diabetes, asthma, a heart condition, kidney problem or thyroid conditions as these conditions indicate a higher risk of reaction to the contrast agent. Fortunately with the safety of the newest contrast agents the adverse effects are very rare.

The department of Radiodiagnosis & Imaging at EHIRC is well equipped to deal any emergency. A CT examination usually takes from 15 minutes to half an hour. When the exam is over, the patient may be asked to wait until the images are examined to determine if more images are needed.

For the CT Angiography contrast medium is injected into a vein with an automatic injector machine that controls the timing & rate of injection, which may continue during part of the time images are recorded. Afterwards the images are reviewed & some will be repeated, if necessary. The real work of CT angiography comes after the images are acquired, when powerful computer programs process the images & make it possible to display them in different ways.

When it is done/advised ?
It is done when clinicians prescribe it after examining patient and going through his/her records. The radiologists also advise for CT scan when routine x-rays and ultrasonography fail to provide adequate information. It is better device for interventional procedures.


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The contents or materials provided in this website are for general information only and are not intended as medical advice.

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Robotic Surgery

Provided by Escorts Heart Institute
Brought to you by Healthbase

Surgeon on Robotic Console

Robotic System-daVinci Telemanipulation Robotic Cardiac Surgery is performed with the help of da Vinci telemanipulation system (Intutive Surgical, Inc, Mountain View, California, USA). The da Vinci system is computer enhanced system that consists of surgeon’s console and cart mounted manipulators.

 

Such endoscopic surgery works well for several types of operations (such as gall bladder removal and knee repairs) where part of the body to be operated upon motionless and surgical maneuvers to be performed are relatively simple. Thus endoscopic surgery has achieved only limited success in more complicated operations such as heart surgery, where the heart is beating and the necessary surgical maneuvers are complex.

 

The console houses the display system showing three dimensional pictures of the patient’s chest cavity, the surgeon sits away from the patient at the console and gets the view of inside of the patient’s chest cavity. The manipulators hold the tiny instrumentswhich go inside the patient’s chest. Surgeon’s hand movements are transmitted to these instruments facilitate different cardiac operations. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), mitral valve repairs and closure of atrial septal defects have been performed successfully through this technique.

IMA – LAD Anastomosis with Robotic Instruments

T-CAB (Totally Endoscopic Coronary Artery Bypass) T-CAB is performing Coronary artery Bypass totally endoscopically without opening the chest at all. T-CAB is performed with the help of computer assisted robotic technology(da Vinci telemanipulation system). The robot is not autonomous. On the robotic console surgeon’s hand motions are captured, transformed and then transmitted to tiny instruments inside the chest cavity to perform complicated cardiac procedures. The surgeon’s had movements are transmitted to tiny instruments that facilitate and endoscopic anastomosis. The control is so perfect that cardiac surgeons are able to construct an anastomosis in the customary fashion without placing a hand inside the chest cavity. The surgeon sits at a console, peering into the chest with 3-dimensional vision and working with perfection. This technique has great cosmetic advantage as there are only 3-incisions, each only 1 cm in diameter on the side and lower part of chest instead of long cut in the front of the conventional surgery. A smaller incision (cut) also means less pain, faster healing and recovery and short hospital stay.


Brought to you by Healthbase www.healthbase.com info@healthbase.com 1-888-MY1-HLTHHealthbase is the trusted source for global medical choices, connecting patients to leading hospitals around the world, through secure and information-rich web portal. To learn more, visit: http://www.healthbase.com Login to get FREE quote. Access is free.

To become a Healthbase member, just click here. It takes less than two minutes to register. Registration is simple, easy and free.

©2006 Healthbase Online Inc. All rights reserved. | About us
The contents or materials provided in this website are for general information only and are not intended as medical advice

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